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not understand the military? so the budget hearings required us of course, we don't talk about all of the sudan's but i like teaching the course. >> the idea to give a government check there is extra responsibilities. >> and also one more project, a book giveaway? >> one time one-shot that we have a load of fox we collected a bunch of books have never been paid per truckload to go to a landfill. so let's do another and another. we just passed five 5/6 billionth book. looked at the football field. side to side with and that is about to tractor to there and it is a library and a box. then we send items so some of the review books we dead and we believe we have the largest volunteer base contribution in the world that we can ship in expensive way. we have 4,048 contained but other organizations start at 16,000 because they use individuals. we bring them in and sort them out. >> and but to other countries? >> we have done 40 countries. most african but you pakistan, tajikistan and south american countd sort them out. >> and but to other countries? >> we have done 40 countries. most african but you
generation starting to use their hands more and work together in communities and share ideas a little more. digital tools -- he created a magazine for the movement. baker affairs which are hugely successful, 100,000 people come over the weekend, there was one in new york a couple weekends ago. the maker of movement was something they identified first, leading edge tech publishers, so not incidental that they spotted this was technologically driven ball so -- i hope tim o'reilly will forgive me the roots are in the 60s kind of social change, power of the people. they have their roots in the country and recognize justice steve jobs it a cultural revolution under this as well. it was a combination of digital technology and new tools allowing people to do extraordinary things and the recognition that people want to use their hands. we are all makers on something. if you r cook your maker. if you our gardener you are a maker. kids are born makers. there is the dignity in holding something made in your hand but we didn't have the skills to do this stuff. most of us didn't have the skills and wha
the electrical wiring in along with a plastic and now i can use other substances like starch-based substances which is biodegradable. i had the privilege of talking to a biologist in new york and he is developing a dna printer. yeah, so we know how to sequence things pretty easily. the sequences are not hard. i can find them on ebay now. but printing out, to print the dna, it is a big tool. but every year we get our flu shots, right? we definitely will soon. we can guess what the flu is going to be this year. we never know. rather than at the beginning of the season the doctor says, actually, it turns out that influenza is the this or that end, here's a little code and print out your own vaccine. and, you know, you little liquid and drink it and that is a 3-d printer as well. that is printing dna, which is a physical material. you have to ask things like what could go wrong and questions to that effect. i think the only thing that stands in our way, i have seen a lot of elitist types of technology and i'm very impressed. i agree that you're not going to print them out anytime soon. but you ca
started. this is live coverage running just a few minutes late. again, a reminder you can follow us on facebook and facebook.com/booktv and we have exclusive updates and author interviews, et cetera on her facebook page. just waiting for mr. patterson. this should be to shortly ensure that coverage of the miami book fair international 29th year. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. please take your seats. we are about to begin the session. thank you so much. i am marilou harrison and many of you have heard from me because he been in this room yesterday and today. i served as a volunteer here, a very proud: tiered of miami book fair international candidate to recognize is that done before, all of the volunteers come to thousands of volunteers for miami dade college as well as the community who come together reach you to think this book fair take place. i'd also like to recognize those who are fri
he had a number of times when he used the word nigger, not to insult black people, but to turn the table on people who were antiblack in their feeling and he used the word nigger to laugh at them. using the word nigger as a mirror on race simple in order to combat racism. adore used the word anythinger in some of her short stories. she wasn't using it to be a racist. rather, she was using is as an artist to de-legitimate race simple. that's what i meant. obviously there are black people, too who have used the term nigger in ways that in my view, are completely unobjectionable. dick gregory titled his first autobiography, "nigger "an autobiography." and richard pryor with two great albums, "that nigger is crazy" and bicentennial nigger." >> host: when you wrote the book, it was published in 2002. what reaction did you get? >> host: when i do. >> guest: when i wrote the book i got a lot of reaction, some positive and some negative. and continue to get some positive reactions and negative reactions. some people took real offense at the title. if there was one aspect of the book th
just describe it. by the way, i wish you had not reminded liberals that many of us don't think they've done so well in trying to destroy me because more than any book i've ever written, i have never had a book so ignored by the mainstream media. [laughter] i always make -- this is one thing i changed my mind about. i've maintained ferociously liberals can't learn that if you cut taxes, there's revenue to the treasury, can't learn it doesn't work to coddle and suck up to terrorists, but, apparently, they can learn if they attack ann coulter, she sells more books. [laughter] i love those gals on "the view," and i wanted to kiss them all before i left. [laughter] you know, i realize that people who are familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make t
. please raise your hands. this is what mr. up the growth tells us in his book, but mike gillette has something else to tell us entirely, and i'm going to let him tell us. his particular story of how that came to be. >> well, she told me that the name was actually given to her by her to african american playmates, stuff and doodlebug. and, of course, ladybird is another word for lady bug. apparently it was decided later at some point that it needed the name -- the name needed to be attributed to her adult nurse because to do otherwise might give the indication of social interaction between the races, but -- and i have never read that anywhere else, but that is what she told me anyway. taken for what it's worth. >> isn't that fascinating? it's like the precursor to the civil rights act. >> this conversation is taking a nasty turn since i found out i got my tac -- facts wrong. [laughter] >> you know, you got so many other facts right in your book, i don't think you need to worry. i would like you each to talk a little bit, starting with you, marc, about the different facets and aspects
that i don't believe that technology is always the answer to everything. the language i use is to say that the internet and its success is a role model for us, but it's not necessarily the cure to all our problems. we can look at it and is say, wow, we built that together. what else could we do that would be like that? but it does create these issues, and, you know, on the one hand we can look at privacy and say, sure, these corporations know a lot more about us, but it means the ads we're seeing are actually more relevant to us, and we're actually not just being spammed by people, we're seeing targeted things based on our taste. on the other hand, we have to be more aware as a society, and we have to build systems that let us know where our information is being shared. so it's not that all this stuff is head anything a positive direction -- heading in a positive direction, but if we're smart about it and we're optimistic and we apply ourselves and use some of these principles, there's a lot of reason to be hopeful about what we can do. >> host: and finally, michael e-mails in, do you
. please let us know about hookers in your area and we will add them to our list. post them to our while i facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at tv at c-span.org. >> you are watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at our lineup for tonight beginning at seven eastern. wayne carlin discusses his book, wandering souls. with booktv from george mason university. at 730 eastern, beatrice hopman over the last 80 years. at 830, thomas stanton and why some firms thrive why others fail. and at 10:00 p.m. eastern, we conclude the prime time programming with our "after words" program. david cay johnston discusses the fine print. he talked with reporter jayne o'donnell. visit booktv.org for this weekend's television schedule. >> in her book, "pat nixon", mary brennan discusses the use of mrs. nixon's private documents. this is just over 60 minutes. >> welcome. i'm the acting director of the library and i appreciate all of you coming to our continuing author copies and patience. today, we are very fortunate to have the leading scholar on pat nixon was 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much
>> i hope you will join us for the reception in extension room 754 with speakers and many of you here and lastly in join me in thanking darlene nipper, and rebecca traister. [applause] .. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> and now from the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas, a discussion of president lyndon johnson and first lady ladybird johnson. this is just over 50 minutes. >> hi, and welcome to the texas book festival.d my name is carol dawson, and iw love being a moderator every year at the texas book festival, and i particularly love this task this year. task this year i have had the privilege of reading two books that interlock so beautifully that it provided one hold 360-degree experience in reading them. before we begin, and i introduce our authors, i want to remind you all that all proceeds of book sales at the texas book festival goats the libraries of this great state. so, please avail yourself of the boo
if they had not met previously. when the woman replied that they had come a pat asked about her stay in the u.s. acquired wishers in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. i've been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech. nixon then lost the hearts are continuing to the previous engagement. i use the story to be different type visit to exemplify several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as foreign diplomat. the path that a woman during one of her trial a second review. the traveling she does was the best part of her job as a political wife. sector, is not the wife of ambassador were statesmen. she was just a young woman who would come to the united states versus the second lady and had come to the united states to study. she treated everyone should not as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sensors and scared and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her ro
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11